Posts Tagged ‘hoof repair’

What You Need To Know About First Aid for Horse Owners

Posted on: August 8th, 2017 by Liddleworks Indie Media No Comments

The first things to consider when it comes to first aid for horse owners are temperature, pulse and breathing, particularly when your horse isn’t acting himself. Check them regularly so you have a record of his normal temperature, pulse, and respiratory rates on hand for comparison in the event of an accident or illness.

How to Check Your Horse’s Temperature

If possible, get someone to help you hold your horse while you take his temperature. Stand to one side of his hindquarters–never behind–and gently lift his tail. Insert the thermometer a few inches into the rectum and hold for one minute. Keep in mind that normal horse temperatures run 37.5 degrees to 38.5 degrees centigrade.

How to Check For Your Horse’s Pulse

Feel for the artery that runs over your horse’s jaw bone. This is the easiest to get an accurate reading from with practice. A normal heart rate is approximately 20 to 40 beats per minute.

Measuring Your Horse’s Respiratory Rate

A normal horse’s respiratory rate is 8 to 12 breaths per minute. You can either count how many times his nostrils flare in a minute, or how many times his ribs move up and down. This method can be trickier than the others and requires patient practice.

How to Treat a Wound

The first two things to remember if your horse suffers an injury is to keep calm, and secure him immediately. Then, gently wash the wound with water in a slow trickle from a hose or plastic syringe. Once clean, you’re free to assess the depth and severity of the wound. Try to steer clear of antiseptics; simply cleaning it and a light bandage should do the trick until the vet arrives.

Call your vet even if a wound near a joint or tendon looks minor, it can cause unseen long-term damage. If a wound won’t stop bleeding and requires stitches, keep pressure on it until the vet arrives. Be aware that the bleeding may be a result of puncture wounds or a hidden, embedded object.

Signs of Eye Injury

The signs of an eye injury include excessive tearing and blinking, it’s swollen or half shut, can be painful to the touch, or any other visible signs of injury.

In the event of a possible eye injury, always call your vet immediately. If left untreated, eye injuries can lead to infection and loss of sight. Try to keep your horse as calm as possible until your vet arrives, and if anything is protruding from the eye, leave it in until the professional arrives no matter how painful it may look.

Possible Fracture

Fractures can actually cause your horse to go into shock, so cover him with a blanket and keep him–and you–calm until professional help arrives. Never move your horse if you suspect a fracture, and call the vet immediately. Be prepared your horse may act distressed, have swelling, and sweat profusely due to the pain. Keep in mind not all fractures will be immediately visible, such as a bone sticking out unnaturally, so watch for sudden lameness.

How To Make an Essential First Aid Kit

Make sure to have the following essential items in a handy kit:

  • Blunt-ended scissors
  • Thermometer
  • Self-sticking crepe bandages
  • Cotton wool
  • Swabs
  • Gloves
  • Torch and wire cutters
  • Paper towel or kitchen roll
  • Gamgee
  • Poultice
  • Salt
  • Small plastic bowl

Consider making a duplicate kit and keep them in different places so you’ll never be looking for one last minute.

No matter what, it’s always best to call your Vet first and follow directions in an emergency. But having these basic tips in the back of your mind while you wait for help to arrive can make all the difference in your horse’s health. If you have any other first aid for horse owners tips, share them on our Facebook page. We’d love to hear from you! 

How To Remove Inflammation in Fetlocks

Posted on: June 16th, 2017 by Liddleworks Indie Media No Comments

The #1 cause for lameness in horses is inflammation of the fetlocks. These metacarpophalangeal and metatarsophalangeal joints, commonly referred to as the “ankle” area, are particularly susceptible to swellings known as “wind puffs”, “wind galls”, or “road puffs”. Critical to a horse’s movement, the dynamic fetlocks are also very sensitive. Leg Saver Therapy will restore balance to lame and compromised areas, and will also remove inflammation in fetlocks quickly.  Signs of Compromised Fetlocks.

When dealing with fetlock and ankle issues, generally the problem is in the rear; whether it be the hocks, whirl bone, sacroiliac, hamstrings or something else. However, when the horse changes its gait for any reason, it places tremendous stress on the front legs. This shifting of weight to the front legs is the cause for most front lameness including the tendon ligament and joint problems. Rear end problems must be addressed before you can achieve front end soundness.

Swelling: Wind Puffs

Wind Puffs are one of the most irritating problems as the horse is not lame, but the puffs are prevalent enough to cause an issue. Wind Puffs are a result of rear end pain issues. If not treated immediately, they will become much more problematic in the future.

How to Prevent Permanent Damage

If you want to avoid permanent damage to the joint, begin by applying poultice on the joint regularly. The Leg Saver will kill any arthritis in the fetlocks and thicken the synovial fluid for smoother functioning of the ankle area. If no chips or internal fractures are present, the Leg Saver will ensure positive results.

Check out our video on how to remove inflammation in fetlocks or read more about Leg Saver Therapy here, or contact us with any questions!

 

 

 

Hoof Health And Repair With The Leg Saver

Posted on: June 1st, 2017 by Liddleworks Indie Media No Comments

Good hoof health starts with quality hoof growth free of infection and increased blood flow to the hoof area. If your horse is showing signs of laminitis, navicular, and founder, or suffers from quarter cracks, then removing inflammation from the hoof is key to successful treatment.

Here’s how The Leg Saver can help you kill all of the infection from your horse’s hooves.

How LEG SAVER increases blood flow and kills infections

By treating the kidney and liver Ting Points (for a run-down on equine acupressure points, check out this summary from The Naturally Healthy Horse), enzymes will be released into the bloodstream. This increased blood flow will help your horse fight infection while accelerating quality hoof growth by ⅜ to ½ an inch per month.

Repairing quarter cracks for healthy hooves

Our experience has lead us to believe that quarter cracks are caused by poor quality horn in the hoof, and in some cases is hereditary from the mother. The LEG SAVER stimulates blood flow to the hoof with the flow of enzymes from the horse’s liver.

Other causes of poor quality hooves

A lot of race horses are administered drugs and other toxins that affect the liver. If they go untreated, will affect their offspring in the form of poor quality hooves.

We also feel that too much sugar and molasses in a horse’s diet can cause liver damage. The liver becomes clogged with toxic plaque because the kidneys can’t function due to an overflow of those toxins. The sulphur in molasses builds up in the liver, which can ultimately damage the entire body depending on the strength of your horse’s immune system.

The bottom line of hoof health

The Equi-Stim Leg Saver is designed to kill all infections through Ting Point Electro Therapy to keep your horse in top form. Have you got any top nutritional tips that keep your horse in tip-top shape to compliment our therapy for whole horse health? Let us know in the comments below or share with us on Facebook!